Convection-or-conduction

2 Terms that certainly confuse many vaporizer beginners, so here is an explanation of the vaporization processes and their advantages and disadvantages.

Convection is the vaporization of the herbs by a hot air stream.
With a convection vaporizer, the air is heated in the heating element and fed either through a pump or simply by pulling the hot air from the heating element through the herb chamber, releasing the aromas and active ingredients.
The advantage of this process is that vaporization only takes place when the unit is pulled or the pump of the unit is switched on.
The most famous convection vaporizer is the stationary Volcano vaporizer, but nowadays there are also portable convection vaporizers like the Boundless CFV.
The advantage of vaporization by convection is that it generates a very aromatic and usually also denser steam, the disadvantage is that this method requires more energy, which is why it is rarely and usually used in conjunction with conduction in portable devices.

Conduction is the direct vaporization by contact by heating the herb chamber around the herbs. Because heating the chamber takes up much less space and energy, this process is mainly used with portable vaporizers. Conduction vaporization thus enables very compact devices such as the Pax 2 & 3 or the Da Vinci IQ.
The disadvantages of conduction are a less pronounced aroma and a less even heating of the herbs.
The last can be compensated by stirring the herbs during the session. It also helps if you raise the temperature at the end of the session to really get the rest of the aromas and active ingredients from the herbs.

Convection & Conduction

Many portable devices on the market, such as the Crafty & Mighty, but also Arizer portable devices use a combination of both methods. This combination means that the units consume less energy than pure convection vaporizers. Nevertheless, they develop a strong aroma that can keep up with that of a tabletop device.
Moreover, even at lower temperatures, these vaporizers produce a denser vapor than pure conduction vaporizers.


Which method you choose depends primarily on your own needs.
If you want to use your device inconspicuously in very busy places, e.g. at the station or in city centres, a compact conduction vaporizer is certainly the best choice.
If you want to be mobile with your device and do not necessarily want to use it in public, then a portable convection vapo or a device that uses both methods is certainly the best choice.